BABTAC response to Press Statement issued by the Government regarding Cosmetic Interventions

Following a breaking news statement by the Government regarding Cosmetic Interventions, BABTAC gives official response to the media. Standardised training likely outcome to cosmetic interventions review; suggested and supported by BABTAC.
A press release issued on the 1st April, gives an indication of the likely outcome of the Government Review into cosmetic interventions led by Sir Bruce Keogh. Stating that “Cosmetic practitioners such as beauty therapists, and doctors who give dermal filler injections should have to get a formal qualification before they can offer treatments,” the press release suggests that a cross-profession, standardised qualification is likely to be implemented.
Carolyne Cross, BABTAC & CIBTAC Chair responds“We are delighted by this interim press statement which suggests that our recommendation of a cross-profession qualification will work to improve consumer safety, without creating a market monopoly. It is our belief that cosmetic interventions need to be delivered in a safe and standardised way by all providers to enable consumer choice without undermining safety.”

She continues “Many have advocated that a blanket ban across certain professions, including beauty therapists will work to automatically deliver improved standards and protect the consumer. It is our belief that this is misguided and that a standardised qualification working on a recognised prior learning framework will be better for improving safety; medically trained providers will be able to focus on key skills such as aesthetic training, whilst non-healthcare providers including beauty therapists can train in all the disciplines.”

At present, due to the lack of recognisable qualifications, BABTAC do not insure any Dermal Filler or Botulinum Toxin providers, but do represent properly qualified Laser, IPL and Chemical Peel members. It is our belief that some beauty therapists should be able to continue practising minimally-invasive cosmetic procedures, as long as they are operating within agreed remits and with proper, nationally-recognised qualifications; it is our belief that not all beauty therapists should be allowed to conduct these procedures, and that agreed training paths should include pre-requisites to ensure minimum practise standards. We recognise that these procedures are not entry-level offerings, but also believe that highly-qualified therapists have the capabilities to learn these skills, and consumers have a demand to receive them. We are sure that the Review will give a balanced overview and that all opinions and professions have been taken into account.

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